Fix It Friday

heretoedit:

Here’s a new entry for Fix It Friday!

BEFORE

Find the main theme for Orange Caramel ‘My Copycat’ !!
Long-awaited ‘Find Orange Caramel’ Season 2 ‘Where’s Orange Caramel? + Find the wrong picture of Orange Caramel’!!

Mission 1. Find the wrong picture!
On the top of the two pictures, there’s a number. Find that number of wrong pictures!
It gets harder so don’t relax your attention even if it’s easy in the beginning^^!
+ ??? How many wrong spots are there in the picture marked with ‘???’ ? Find it out together!

Mission 2. Where’s Orange Caramel?
They are hidden in places on different level than season 1! No more hints!

Mission 3. Find hidden ‘Mr. Cho’!
Cho Seho made a surprise appearance in the music video! Where is he?
+Other two artists from PLEDIS are also in it as surprising guests~

Please take a closer look at the people who wore Wally costume!
We raised the degree of difficulty for season 2!
There’s more than one thing to find right? You won’t be able to find everything in your first attempt!

Give it a try! If you succeed despite the high level of difficulty, mission complete!
Oh! there’s one thing you should be aware of for this mission.
Do not comment your answers!!

If you completed the mission, please send us your answers!
We will give away Orange Caramel’s autographed CD and the Skecher’s sneakers that the members are wearing in the music video.

It’s advantageous to keep your answers secret until this event ends, right? + Don’t take away the fun of finding the answers!

AFTER

Find the main theme for Orange Caramel’s My Copycat!
Here’s the long-awaited Find Orange Caramel Season 2: Where’s Orange Caramel? It’s now time to find the wrong pictures of Orange Caramel!

Mission 1: Find the wrong picture!
There’s a number on the top of each picture. Figure out which number has the wrong picture!
It gets harder, so don’t relax even if it’s easy in the beginning^^!
How many errors are in each picture? Let’s find it out together!

Mission 2: Where’s Orange Caramel?
The members are hidden in more difficult places than in season 1. No more hints!

Mission 3: Find the hidden Mr. Cho!
Cho Seho made a surprise appearance in the music video! Where is he?
Two other artists from PLEDIS also appear as surprise guests.
Please take a closer look at the people in Wally costumes!

There’s more than one thing to find, right? We raised the degree of difficulty for season 2, so you won’t be able to find everything in your first attempt!

Give it a try! If you succeed despite the high level of difficulty, then your mission’s complete!
Oh, there’s one more thing, do not put your answers in the comment section!

If you complete the mission, please send us your answers! We will be giving away copies of Orange Caramel’s autographed CD and the Skechers sneakers that the members are wearing.

It’s advantageous to keep your answers secret until this event ends. Don’t spoil the fun by revealing the answers to everyone!

This post was okay, except from some grammar issues and too many exclamation points.

Well, I hope this was helpful! If you want to submit something for Fix It Friday, please send it by 5pm on Thursday.

Have a nice weekend ^^.

Picking the Correct Word from Troublesome Pairs

wordworkerdn:

I originally wrote this post for blog.enroll.com.

English is full of words that look or sound the same but have different meanings, and differentiating between these troublesome pairs (or threesomes or foursomes) will help you polish your writing. In my years as a writing tutor, I’ve sought and created tricks to determine which word you want in a given context. Here’s my list.

  • Affect and effect. Ninety-five percent of the time, this trick will work. Affect is a verb (an action word). Both affect and action start with a. So, effect is the noun. You won’t need to worry about the other five percent unless you’re writing for psychology or for a scholarly audience.
  • Affective and effective. Ninety-five percent of the time, you mean effective. If something has an effect, it’s effective. Psychologists may mean affective.
  • Complement and compliment. Complement means “to complete,” “to round out,” or “something that completes or goes with.” This trick comes from Woe Is I by Patricia O’Connor: Both complement and complete contain two e’s. Compliment means “to praise” or “an expression of praise” (95).
  • Its and it’s. Quit using contractions in writing assignments, and it will be harder to mix up these two words. The possessive form is its, and the contraction is it’s. Remember, not all possessive words have apostrophes (for example, mine, yours).
  • Lay and lie. Lay involves doing something to an object, as in, “Lay the hammer aside.” Lie means “to recline.”
  • Principle and principal. Principles are concepts, and principals are people who play principal, or leading, roles. This trick comes from O’Connor: “If you’re good in school, the principal is your p-a-l” (106). Exception: There is a financial term called a principal, so remember that financial and principal end in the same two letters.
  • Their, there, and they’re. I remember the difference between the first two by removing the t from there and their in my mind: heir, here. An heir is someone who will own something, so their is the possessive word. Here is a location, so there refers to places or placeholders. As for they’re, quit using contractions, and you won’t need to worry about this one. Plus, avoiding contractions can make writing sound more formal, which professors will appreciate.
  • To, too, and two. Since too means “in addition” or works as an intensifier (for example, “too much”), it has an additional o. Two has a w in it because twice has a w. In other instances, you probably mean to.
  • Weather and whether. The first refers to climate, and the second is the one used in a sentence like “I don’t know whether I should.” The function of whether is similar to that of which. Remember that both of these words start with wh, and that should help you.
  • Who’s and whose. Another reason to avoid contractions! Who’s means “who is,” and whose is a possessive pronoun, as in, “Whose shoes are these?” Use that rhyming phrase to help you remember the difference.

I know English is frustrating when it comes to the words in this list. I didn’t invent this language! I hope that these tricks help you edit your writing. Happy writing!

Work Cited: O’Connor, Patricia T. Woe Is I: The Grammarphobe’s Guide to Better English in Plain English, rev. ed. New York: Riverhead, 2003. Print.

Photo by Pixably, Flickr Creative Commons

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